Skip to main content

Unravelling Law's Kinning Practices: Feminism, Fictive Families and the Albert Kennedy Trust

Carr, Helen, Hunter, C. (2012) Unravelling Law's Kinning Practices: Feminism, Fictive Families and the Albert Kennedy Trust. Feminist Legal Studies, 20 (2). pp. 105-120. ISSN 0966-3622. (doi:10.1007/s10691-012-9200-2) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:30057)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10691-012-9200-2

Abstract

In 1989 Smart problematised law as a masculinist knowledge which disqualified other forms of knowledge, particularly feminism. Twenty-one years later Smart characterises the relationship between law and feminism quite differently. In this account law responds to feminism and outcomes are progressive. Smart suggests that rather than continuing to focus on law’s disciplinary and normalising role, it is more productive to conceptualise contemporary family law as a creative kinning practice. We argue, however, that we must also bring into this account the changes to the state brought about by neo-liberalism. The paper tests these observations about the trajectories of feminism, law and neo-liberalism by reflecting upon our study of the Albert Kennedy Trust (AKT). AKT was established in 1989, in the wake of gay and lesbian resistance to Clause 28, to provide homes with gay and lesbian adults for homeless gay and lesbian teenagers. We are interested in AKT’s shift in its description of the adults’ relationship with the teenagers in their care from ‘brothers and sisters’ to ‘carers’ as it moved from a marginal force to mainstream partner/provider. In this context we explore the complexity of law’s responsiveness to feminism’s dynamism, its contingent recognition of kinning practices and, in the light of neo-liberalism, its continuing disciplinary role.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1007/s10691-012-9200-2
Subjects: K Law
Divisions: Divisions > Division for the Study of Law, Society and Social Justice > Kent Law School
Depositing User: Jenny Harmer
Date Deposited: 08 Aug 2012 10:37 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2021 12:41 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/30057 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Carr, Helen: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8025-1288
  • Depositors only (login required):