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Assessing the relative importance of conservation measures applied on sea turtles: comparison of measures focusing on nesting success and hatching recruitment success

Mazaris, Antonios D., Kramer-Schadt, Stephanie, Tzanopoulos, Joseph, Johst, Karin, Matsinos, Giannis, Pantis, John D. (2009) Assessing the relative importance of conservation measures applied on sea turtles: comparison of measures focusing on nesting success and hatching recruitment success. Amphibia-Reptilia, 30 (2). pp. 221-231. ISSN 0173-5373. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/156853809788201180

Abstract

Conservation measures applied to sea turtle nesting sites have a beneficial effect on population trends and dynamics. Such measures aim to protect nesting females, increase nesting success (proportion of female emergences resulting in nests) and/or to improve hatching and hatchling emergence success. However, taking into account financial and time constrains it is important to identify those measures that have the most positive impact on the sea turtle population. The aim of this paper is to assess and compare the relative importance of the different factors that may influence the efficiency of conservation actions and to investigate which factors, those associated with decreased nesting success, or others leading to higher embryonic and hatchling mortality have a higher impact on overall hatchling recruitment. We developed a model that simulates the nesting activity of sea turtles. For model parameterization, we used data collected from nesting sites of the loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) in the Eastern Mediterranean. We conducted a series of simulations by simultaneously changing model input parameters. The results of the model illustrate that an increase in hatchling recruitment success (i.e., hatching and hatchling emergence success) would have a more positive effect on overall hatchling production than a similar in nesting success. Our analysis further suggests that changes in hatchling recruitment success even at a single site, could have an important impact on overall hatchling production of the rookery.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: conservation, habitat quality, hatchling emergence success, hatchling recruitment, hatchling success, nesting activity, nesting habitats, sea turtles
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH541 Ecology
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH75 Conservation (Biology)
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation
Depositing User: Joseph Tzanopoulos
Date Deposited: 24 Nov 2014 10:25 UTC
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2020 04:06 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/30021 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Tzanopoulos, Joseph: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3322-2019
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