Compensations for diminished terminal oxidase activity in Escherichia coli: cytochrome bd-II-mediated respiration and glutamate metabolism.

Shepherd, Mark and Sanguinetti, Guido and Cook, Gregory M and Poole, Robert K (2010) Compensations for diminished terminal oxidase activity in Escherichia coli: cytochrome bd-II-mediated respiration and glutamate metabolism. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 285 (24). pp. 18464-72. ISSN 0021-9258. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M110.118448

Abstract

Escherichia coli possesses cytochrome bo' (CyoABCDE), cytochrome bd-I (CydAB), and cytochrome bd-II (AppBC) quinol oxidases, all of which can catalyze the terminal step in the aerobic respiratory chain, the reduction of oxygen by ubiquinol. Although CydAB has a role in the generation of DeltapH, AppBC has been proposed to alleviate the accumulation of electrons in the quinone pool during respiratory stress via electroneutral ubiquinol oxidation. A cydB mutant strain exhibited lower respiration rates while maintaining a wild type growth rate. Transcriptomic analysis revealed a dramatic up-regulation of AppBC in the cydB strain, accompanied by the induction of genes involved in glutamate/gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) antiport, the GABA shunt, the glyoxylate shunt, respiration (including appBC), motility, and osmotic stress. Transcription factor modeling suggests that the underpinning regulation is largely controlled by H-NS, GadX, FlhDC, and AppY. The transcriptional adaptations imply that cydB cells contribute to the proton motive force via consumption of intracellular protons and glutamate/GABA antiport. Indeed, supplementation of culture medium with l-glutamate stimulates growth in a cydB strain. Phenotype analyses of the cydB strain confirm decreased motility and elevated acid resistance and also an elevated cytochrome d spectroscopic signal in cells grown at low pH. We propose a mechanism via which E. coli can compensate for the loss of cytochrome bd-I activity; cytochrome bd-II-mediated quinol oxidation prevents the accumulation of NADH, whereas GABA synthesis/antiport maintains the proton motive force for ATP production.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Q Science
Divisions: Faculties > Science Technology and Medical Studies > School of Biosciences
Depositing User: Mark Shepherd
Date Deposited: 01 Sep 2011 15:53
Last Modified: 29 Apr 2014 08:20
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/28102 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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