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Remediation of inorganics and organics in industrial and urban contaminated soils

Burns, Richard G. and Rogers, S. and McGhee, Ilona (1996) Remediation of inorganics and organics in industrial and urban contaminated soils. In: Naidu, R. and Kookana, R.S. and Oliver, D.P. and Rogers, S. and McLaughlin, M.J., eds. Contaminants and the Soil Environment in the Australasia-Pacific Region Proceedings of the First Australasia-Pacific Conference on Contaminants and Soil Environment in the Australasia-Pacific Region. Kluwer Academic, pp. 411-449. ISBN 978-94-010-7226-7. E-ISBN 978-94-009-1626-5. (doi:10.1007/978-94-009-1626-5_13) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-94-009-1626-5_13

Abstract

As land previously occupied by industry comes under pressure for redevelopment, it becomes evident that a large number of these sites are contaminated. Such contamination is a concern if it has the potential to become a health hazard to site occupiers or a threat to overall environmental quality. Soil remediation is a young technology whose ultimate success will be dependent upon a combination of chemical, physical and biological knowledge. This knowledge must be built on a sound understanding of the basic science behind the mobility, reactivity and toxicity of pollutants in natural ecosystems. However, the economics of remediation and the end-use of the treated land will be major factors in the widespread adoption of clean-up technologies. Possibly the greatest single stimulus for soil remediation will be legislative pressures that define the limits of various contaminants in soil, water and the atmosphere. These standards are likely to become increasingly stringent as analytical techniques improve. Whilst there may be little justification for these levels from toxicological data, the overriding consideration will be to reduce inorganic and organic contaminant levels to ‘below detectable limits’. The implementation and policing of these regulations will be a political as well as a scientific issue and special pleading, focused on using the best available technology, risk assessment and economics, will be a common feature of the debate.

Item Type: Book section
DOI/Identification number: 10.1007/978-94-009-1626-5_13
Uncontrolled keywords: Hazardous Waste; United States Environmental Protection Agency; Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon; Landfill Site; Health Risk Assessment
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Biosciences
Depositing User: M.A. Ziai
Date Deposited: 15 May 2009 18:21 UTC
Last Modified: 06 Aug 2019 11:19 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/18854 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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