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Generation of environmentally enhanced products: Clean technology for paper chemicals

Hardman, David J., Huxley, Margaret, Bull, Alan T., Slater, J. Howard, Bates, Roberts (1996) Generation of environmentally enhanced products: Clean technology for paper chemicals. Journal of Chemical Technology and Biotechnology, 70 (1). pp. 60-66. ISSN 0268-2575. (doi:10.1002/(SICI)1097-4660(199709)70:1<60::AID-JCTB656>3.0.CO;2-R) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:18095)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1097-4660(199709)7...

Abstract

The modification of existing chemical manufacturing processes to selectively remove unwanted chemicals in products, offers a realistic approach to novel clean technologies. Adjunct biotechnological processing offers a means to achieve the manufacture of new environmentally enhanced products (EEPs). This paper describes the development and implementation of a bioprocess for the manufacture of an enhanced paper chemical. The process was integrated into existing manufacturing plants involved in the production of neutral curing poly(aminoamide) chemicals which are used commercially to impart wet-strength to paper products such as tissues and towels (e.g. Kymene(R) wet-strength resins). A consequence of the epichlorohydrin chemistry involved in the polymer's manufacture, haloalcohols (predominantly, 1,3-dichloropropan-2-ol (DCP) and 1-chloropropanediol (3-CPD)) contaminate the product. The objective was to reduce the concentration of the two haloalcohols in Kymene(R)-SLX wet-strength resins (c. 8000 ppm db) without affecting the performance of the product. A two-membered bacterial consortium was used in an aerobic stirred tank bioreactor system which was capable of rapidly reducing the concentrations of DCP and CPD in an aqueous solution of the wet-strength resin to less than 1 ppm and 5 ppm respectively. A 3000 dm(3) bioreactor was integrated into two established manufacturing plants, generating a reliable and predictable process to enhance the value of the neutral curing wet-strength chemical.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-4660(199709)70:1<60::AID-JCTB656>3.0.CO;2-R
Additional information: Conference Information: Clean Tech 96 Brunel Univ, Uxbridge, England, Jul, 1996 J Chem Technol & Biotechnol Presented in part at Clean Tech '96, London, 19-21 June 1996.
Uncontrolled keywords: bioprocessing; clean technology; commercial process; dehalogenation; wet-strength resins
Subjects: Q Science
Q Science > QR Microbiology
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Natural Sciences > School of Biosciences
Depositing User: M.A. Ziai
Date Deposited: 03 May 2009 11:15 UTC
Last Modified: 01 Aug 2019 10:32 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/18095 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Bull, Alan T.: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6223-7722
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