John Lubbock and mental evolution

Clark, J.F.M. (1998) John Lubbock and mental evolution. Endeavour, 22 (2). pp. 44-47. ISSN 0160-9327. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Abstract

Best remembered as author of the Bank Holidays Act (1871) and as a darwinian anthropologist and archaeologist, John Lubbock, first Baron Avebury (1834-1913), based a considerable portion of his intellectual career upon the study of social insects. Specifically, he sought to delineate the evolutionary mental continuum between human beings and other non-human animals. This scientific pursuit led him to 'tame' a wasp, to construct unique artificial ants' nests, and to teach a dog to 'read'.

Item Type: Article
Depositing User: I. Ghose
Date Deposited: 29 Jun 2011 08:25
Last Modified: 29 Jun 2011 08:25
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/17647 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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