Exploring phonological encoding through repeated segments.

Damian, Markus and Dumay, Nicolas (2009) Exploring phonological encoding through repeated segments. Language and Cognitive Processes, 24 (5). pp. 685-712. ISSN 0169-0965 . (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01690960802351260

Abstract

Five experiments explored the influence of repeated phonemes on the production of short utterances. In Experiment 1 coloured object naming showed faster latencies when colour and object started with the same phoneme ('green goat') than when they did not; the opposite was found when colour and object were named on consecutive trials ('green' - 'goat'). Experiments 2 and 3 focused on adjective-noun phrases and showed no effect of repeated phonemes on either acoustical duration of speeded responses, or latencies in a delayed variant of the task, suggesting a higher-level - rather than articulatory - locus of the effect. Experiments 4 and 5 demonstrated that the facilitation induced by repeated segments is not specific to word onset ('green chain') and is independent of whether or not the repeated phonemes occupy the same within-word position ('green flag'). These results indicate that in the production of multiple words, word forms are concurrently activated and evoke phonological segments represented in a position-nonspecific manner.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: Phonological encoding; Repetition priming; Spoken production
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Q Science > QP Physiology (Living systems)
P Language and Literature > P Philology. Linguistics
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Cognitive Psychology
Depositing User: N. Dumay
Date Deposited: 11 Jun 2009 08:56
Last Modified: 15 Jun 2009 14:35
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/14927 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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