Skip to main content

Advances in Artificial Life 8th European Conference, ECAL 2005, Canterbury, UK, September 5-9, 2005. Proceedings

Capcarrere, Mathieu S. and Freitas, Alex A. and Bentley, Peter J. and Johnson, Colin G. and Timmis, Jon, eds. (2005) Advances in Artificial Life 8th European Conference, ECAL 2005, Canterbury, UK, September 5-9, 2005. Proceedings. Lecture Notes in Computer Science . Springer, Berlin, Germany, 949 pp. ISBN 978-3-540-28848-0. E-ISBN 978-3-540-31816-3. (doi:10.1007/11553090) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:14256)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/11553090

Abstract

The Artificial Life term appeared more than 20 years ago in a small corner of New Mexico, USA. Since then the area has developed dramatically, many researchers joining enthusiastically and research groups sprouting everywhere. This frenetic activity led to the emergence of several strands that are now established fields in themselves. We are now reaching a stage that one may describe as maturer: with more rigour, more benchmarks, more results, more stringent acceptance criteria, more applications, in brief, more sound science. This, which is the natural path of all new areas, comes at a price, however. A certain enthusiasm, a certain adventurousness from the early years is fading and may have been lost on the way. The field has become more reasonable. To counterbalance this and to encourage lively discussions, a conceptual track, where papers were judged on criteria like importance and/or novelty of the concepts proposed rather than the experimental/theoretical results, has been introduced this year. A conference on a theme as broad as Artificial Life is bound to be very diverse, but a few tendencies emerged. First, fields like ‘Robotics and Autonomous Agents’ or ‘Evolutionary Computation’ are still extremely active and keep on bringing a wealth of results to the A-Life community. Even there, however, new tendencies appear, like collective robotics, and more specifically self-assembling robotics, which represent now a large subsection. Second, new areas appear.

Item Type: Edited book
DOI/Identification number: 10.1007/11553090
Uncontrolled keywords: artificial life, evolutionary computation
Subjects: Q Science > QA Mathematics (inc Computing science) > QA 76 Software, computer programming,
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Computing, Engineering and Mathematical Sciences > School of Computing
Depositing User: Mark Wheadon
Date Deposited: 24 Nov 2008 18:02 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2021 12:25 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/14256 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
  • Depositors only (login required):