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Persistence of and changes in neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer disease over 6 months: the LASER-AD study

Ryu, Seung-Ho, Katona, Cornelius, Rive, Benoit, Livingston, Gill (2005) Persistence of and changes in neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer disease over 6 months: the LASER-AD study. American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 13 (11). pp. 976-983. ISSN 1064-7481. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:12264)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)

Abstract

Neuropsychiatric symptoms ( NPS) are common in Alzheimer disease ( AD). It is important in terms of management to know their natural history and their effects on service use. The authors aimed to determine the persistence and change in severity of NPS over 6 months in participants with AD, and the relationship to initial severity, drug management, use of services, and cost of care. Methods: NPS scores and data on cognition, psychotropic medication, service use, and costs of care were collected on 224 participants at baseline and on 198 at 6-month follow-up. Results: Of 224 patients, 210 (93.8%)had NPS at baseline; 168 ( 75.0%) had at least one clinically significant symptom, 118 (80.4%) of whom had persistent significant symptoms at 6-month follow-up. There was no significant change in mean NPS score for any symptom over 6 months, but many individuals became better or worse; 61.2% of those with at least one significant baseline symptom in any domain improved. Those with persistent symptoms had more severe baseline symptoms. Deterioration in NPS was predicted by deterioration in MMSE. Those with at least one clinically significant symptom had higher care costs than those without. Conclusions: NPS were highly persistent overall, but many individuals became better or worse. Persistence was predicted by having more severe symptoms at baseline. Clinically significant levels of NPS were associated with greater costs of care. The relatively few associations found between specific psychiatric treatments and changes in NPS reflect both undertreatment

Item Type: Article
Additional information: NOT IN FILE
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Divisions: Divisions > Division for the Study of Law, Society and Social Justice > School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research
Depositing User: M.P. Stone
Date Deposited: 11 Sep 2008 17:21 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2021 12:22 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/12264 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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