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Towards a Framework for Improvement in the Management of Demand in Agri-Food Supply Chains

Fearne, Andrew, Taylor, David H. (2006) Towards a Framework for Improvement in the Management of Demand in Agri-Food Supply Chains. Supply Chain Management, 11 (5). pp. 379-384. ISSN 1359-8546. (doi:10.1108/13598540610682381) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
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http://www.emeraldinsight.com/10.1108/135985406106...

Abstract

Purpose – To highlight the problems with and propose a framework for improving demand management in retail food supply chains. Design/methodology/approach – The paper draws on empirical evidence from multiple case studies and develops a framework for improvement in demand management for retail food supply chains. Findings – Analysis of the characteristics of demand within a number of retail food supply chains demonstrates a propensity for misalignment of demand and supply due to issues such as demand amplification, inappropriate production policies and inconsistencies with information systems and data handling procedures. Research limitations/implications – The case study evidence on which the conceptual framework is based is drawn exclusively from the UK, where retail food supply chains are generally more mature than in other parts of the world. The proposed framework is based on empirical evidence but has not been formally tested. Practical implications – More collaboration, information sharing and joint planning beyond the manufacturer‐retailer interface is critical if retail food supply chains are to function efficiently and effectively in retail environments where promotional activity creates significant uncertainty. Originality/value – Demand management in retail food supply chains has received little attention from supply chain researchers to date. This paper proposes a framework for improvement based on greater collaboration and joint planning from farm to fork.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1108/13598540610682381
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > Kent Business School
Depositing User: Andrew Fearne
Date Deposited: 05 Sep 2008 13:30 UTC
Last Modified: 12 Jun 2019 15:33 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/11873 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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