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'"Quantifying” qualitative data: an illustrative example of the use of Q methodology in psychosocial research’

Shemmings, David (2006) '"Quantifying” qualitative data: an illustrative example of the use of Q methodology in psychosocial research’. Qualitative Research in Psychology, 3 (2). pp. 147-165. ISSN 1478 - 0887. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)

Abstract

This article focuses on an application of Q methodology (QM) to an appliedarea of psychological research. It constitutes a complementary sequel to a recent paper in these pages by Watts and Stenner (2005) and outlines how QM can be used to identify patterns and themes in interview transcripts, fieldnotes or naturalistic observation, as a complementary alternative to other qualitative analytic methods. QM was devised by William Stephenson in the 1930s, after he developed considerable misgivings over what he saw as the almost exclusively positivist leanings of psychological research methodology at the time (a trend which, arguably, has only been challenged relatively recently). QM is now increasingly seen by some research psychologists as providing an innovative approach to qualitative analysis, by strengthening conceptual categorization through the quantification of patterned subjectivities, using Q-sorts. Although QM deploys factor analysis, the mathematics of which is complex, it is a ‘user-friendly’ method and requires no knowledge of mathematics to interpret the data obtained. Key theoretical constructs of QM are first outlined and then illustrated with an example from a relatively undiscovered area of attachment theory: later life filial relationships between adult children and their aging parents. Six factors emerged in line with contemporary attachment-based research predictions about attachment security and insecurity

Item Type: Article
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research
Depositing User: David Shemmings
Date Deposited: 09 Sep 2008 09:31 UTC
Last Modified: 28 May 2019 13:47 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/10817 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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