Long-Term Outcome for People with Severe Intellectual Disabilities: Impact of Social Impairment

Beadle-Brown, J. and Murphy, G.H. and Wing, L. (2005) Long-Term Outcome for People with Severe Intellectual Disabilities: Impact of Social Impairment. American Journal on Mental Retardation, 110 (1). pp. 1-12. ISSN 0895-8017. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1352/0895-8017(2005)110<1:LOF...

Abstract

Results from a 25-year follow-up study of the Camberwell Cohort (L. Wing & Gould, 1978, 1979) were presented. Ninety-one people, ranging in age from 27 to 41 years, were traced, and an outcome measure was developed incorporating independent functioning, residential placement, employment, and quality of life. Outcome was rated as either poor (53%) or fair (43%), with only 3% having a good outcome. Using logistic regression methods, we found that the best predictor of outcome was social impairment, with those who were socially impaired, particularly those in the aloof category, having a poorer outcome. Higher IQ at Time 1 and lower challenging behavior were also predictive of better outcome. An in-depth look at social impairment revealed that social impairment remained stable over time.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: long term outcome intellectual disabilities
Subjects: H Social Sciences
H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Tizard
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research
Depositing User: Samantha Osborne
Date Deposited: 19 Dec 2007 18:22
Last Modified: 29 Nov 2012 15:50
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/607 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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