Effect of Service Structure and Organization on Staff Care Practices in Small Community Homes for People with Intellectual Disabilities

Mansell, Jim and Beadle-Brown, Julie and Whelton, Beckie and Beckett, Celia and Hutchinson, Aislinn (2008) Effect of Service Structure and Organization on Staff Care Practices in Small Community Homes for People with Intellectual Disabilities. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 21 (5). pp. 398-413. ISSN 1360-2322. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-3148.2007.00410.x

Abstract

Background An important question in community living is what factors influence the extent to which staff provide ‘active support’. Methods Engagement, care practices and a range of staff and organizational characteristics were studied in 72 residential homes serving 359 adults with intellectual disabilities. Managers in 36 settings were trained in person- centred active support (PCAS). A group comparison design and multivariate analysis was used to investigate the relationship between variables. Results The PCAS group showed more active support, assistance, other contact from staff and engagement in meaningful activity but no difference in choice-making or assessment of participation in activities of daily living. The PCAS group had more staff with a professional qualification, were more likely to think that challenging behaviour was caused by lack of stimulation, had attitudes more in line with a policy of community care, rated most care tasks as less difficult, and were more organized to deliver active support. The comparison group were more likely to think that challenging behaviour was learned negative behaviour, showed more teamwork and were more satisfied. Multivariate analysis identified a range of staff and organizational variables associated with engagement and active support. Conclusions The results suggest that some variables which have not hitherto been studied in relation with active support are associated with it. Professional qualification, knowledge and experience appear to be important as do some staff attitudes, clear management guidance, more frequent supervision and team meetings, training and support for staff to help residents engage in meaningful activity.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: active support, quality of care, residential care
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Tizard
Depositing User: Suzanne Duffy
Date Deposited: 13 May 2008 10:08
Last Modified: 29 Apr 2014 09:24
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/2954 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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