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Temporal evolution of wildmeat sales in the High Niger National Park, Guinea, West Africa

Duonamou, Lucie, Konate, Alexandre, Xu, Jiliang, Humle, Tatyana (2019) Temporal evolution of wildmeat sales in the High Niger National Park, Guinea, West Africa. Oryx, . ISSN 0030-6053. (In press) (Access to this publication is currently restricted. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:81512)

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Abstract

The High Niger National Park (HNNP) is one the most important protected areas for biodiversity conservation in Guinea. This study aimed to examine the temporal evolution of the wildmeat trade in the rural area and the nearest urban center of Faranah. Data were collected across markets between August and November, 2017 in three villages around Mafou area of the park and Faranah and compared with equivalent published data from the same areas gathered in 2011, 2001 and 1994-1996. Across all study periods, mammals dominated the bushmeat trade in the Mafou area. In rural areas, we noted a marked increase in the number of carcasses and biomass harvested between 2001 and 2017, while in Faranah, there was no difference between 1994 and 2017, albeit a clear peak in 1996. Overall, across the years, there was an increase in the sale of smaller sized species (<10 kg), as well as marked increase in species that forage on crops, including green monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops) and Warthog (Phacochoerus africanus), in spite of religious taboos against the consumption of primates and suidae. Green monkeys were not sold on markets during the 1990s but represented the dominant species in Faranah in 2011 and 2017. Our findings suggest a marked shift in hunted and traded species, associated with farmers’ crop protection efforts and incentives for additional revenue. This study highlights the value of a longitudinal perspective in shedding light on the dynamic relationship between local livelihoods and biodiversity conservation.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: Bushmeat trade, human-wildlife conflict, Hunting, market surveys, primate conservation
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GN Anthropology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation
Depositing User: Tatyana Humle
Date Deposited: 03 Jun 2020 12:46 UTC
Last Modified: 03 Jun 2020 12:46 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/81512 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Humle, Tatyana: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1919-631X
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