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Criminal behaviour in Black Mirror: Should pain be used as punishment?

Ware, L. (2020) Criminal behaviour in Black Mirror: Should pain be used as punishment? In: Johnson, D.K., ed. Black Mirror and Philosophy. Blackwell, London. (In press) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)

Abstract

The Hunters in White Bear Justice Park “like scaring people.” In “White Christmas”, Joe Potter’s 3 million years of torture was deemed enough for “a proper sentence”. And in the three stories of the “Black Museum” episode, we learn how creative we can get when it comes to imagining ways to cause pain, effectively and efficiently. This chapter takes a close look at the three punishment episodes of Netflix’s Black Mirror. Is emotional suffering an appropriate aim of criminal punishment? Should the public, as spectators of suffering, enjoy it? What is “closure”--is it justified? Is it a myth? What about the emotional effect of punishment on third parties, specifically the partners and children of prisoners--who can be made to suffer?

Item Type: Book section
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > B Philosophy (General)
N Visual Arts > N Visual arts (General). For photography, see TR
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of European Culture and Languages
Faculties > Humanities > School of European Culture and Languages > Philosophy
Depositing User: Lauren Ware
Date Deposited: 15 Mar 2019 10:14 UTC
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2020 04:19 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/73014 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Ware, L.: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7340-4338
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