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"Reach out your hand and put it in my side": The iconographic transmission and transformation of 'Doubting Thomas' between Latin East and West

Guerry, Emily (2017) "Reach out your hand and put it in my side": The iconographic transmission and transformation of 'Doubting Thomas' between Latin East and West. Material Religion: The Journal of Objects, Art, and Belief, . ISSN 1743-2200. (In press) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:66132)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)

Abstract

The transference of devotional ideas from the Holy Land, with its myriad archetypal pilgrimage destinations and prestigious relics, to Europe is one of many cultural consequences of the Crusades. Specifically, the deliverance of high-status relics and their decorated reliquaries from the Latin East to rulers in the Latin West directly facilitated a surge in the establishment of powerful new cults- and these cults, in turn, needed effective images. In the case of monarchs like the Capetian King Louis IX and Plantagenet King Henry III, their reception of sacred items with a Jerusalemian provenance instigated displays of piety via public processions that framed each translation event as a civic 'adventus'. Then, once the relics were installed in their lavish oratories, Gothic artists adorned the relics' new 'locus sanctus' with site-specific paintings. In each instance, the extant wall paintings of the Crucifixion in the Sainte-Chapelle and Doubting Thomas in Westminster Abbey showcase unusual iconographic compositions that actively break with long-standing traditions of representation in Europe. It is possible that these seemingly novel reinventions actually originated in the Holy Land. By examining a series of surviving objects from the Levant (including reliquaries, mosaics, and paintings) that testify- as material witnesses- to the origins of these iconological creations, this paper will compare and contrast two case studies in attempt to show how the Crusades enabled the movement of relics -from east to west- and, in so doing, reshaped the European religious imagination.'

Item Type: Article
Subjects: D History General and Old World > DE The Greco-Roman World
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of History
Depositing User: Emily Guerry
Date Deposited: 25 Feb 2018 11:02 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 20:17 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/66132 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Guerry, Emily: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1844-3347
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