Dialogic Feedback in the Humanities: Developing Students Feedback Literacy

Pitt, Edd (2017) Dialogic Feedback in the Humanities: Developing Students Feedback Literacy. Higher education pedagogies, . (Submitted) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Abstract

My own previous research (Pitt & Norton, 2016, Pitt, 2017) has suggested that one-way monologic forms of feedback only help certain types of students, namely those who are able to successfully self-regulate (a process of taking control of and evaluating one's own learning and behaviour). It has been suggested that more dialogue rich forms of feedback, such as dialogue with lecturers and peer learning, can develop student’s feedback literacy and may enhance their utilisation of feedback in subsequent assessments (Carless, 2006, 2015; Nicol, 2010, 2013). Such a claim is presently conceptual and has not been empirically investigated across differing disciplines, despite the growing research interest in the area of assessment and feedback within higher education. While this approach is theoretically sound and early studies of its use outside the UK are promising (Carless, 2017), it is sparsely used in UK higher education. To this end little is known about its effects on students’ feedback literacy. One reason it may be rarely used is because it is not well understood how to put dialogic practices in place in mass higher education. This case study research reports findings from film and performance in the Humanities.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: L Education > LB Theory and practice of education > LB2300 Higher Education
Divisions: Faculties > University wide - Teaching/Research Groups > Centre for the Study of Higher Education
Depositing User: Edd Pitt
Date Deposited: 17 Nov 2017 10:38 UTC
Last Modified: 04 Mar 2019 14:10 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/64517 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Pitt, Edd: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7475-0299
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