Reconditioning Stability in Northern Ireland’s Power-Sharing Institutions: Augmenting Liberal Consociationalism

Cochrane, Feargal and Loizides, Neophytos G. (2015) Reconditioning Stability in Northern Ireland’s Power-Sharing Institutions: Augmenting Liberal Consociationalism. under review, . (Submitted) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Abstract

The article examines an unexplored and important question in the conflict resolution literature that is the renegotiation and enhancement of power-sharing structures in post-conflict societies. We focus on Northern Ireland for two reasons. Firstly, the province’s broadly inclusive power-sharing institutions are critically important for consociational theory and are considered to be an attractive model for current mediations in Nepal, Cyprus and Colombia among other places. Secondly, Northern Ireland has been described as a classic example of a successful conflict management approach which despite intermittent and recent setbacks, has helped to secure political stability since 1998. At the same time, in the eyes of its critics, it has proven unable to maintain political legitimacy or transcend deep inter-communal divisions. Drawing on evidence across divided societies, we focus on the empirical and normative challenges of renegotiating necessary but politically risky constitutional revisions in post-conflict societies. We argue for the adoption of additional components within the existing structures of the Northern Irish power-sharing model and investigate how these reforms could build consensus and incentives for positive rather than negative voting, thus contributing to a transformative agenda. More specifically, we draw elements from comparable arrangements in the Brussels Capital Region and argue for a series of other less formalized adjustments to Northern Ireland’s current institutions.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: J Political Science > JN Political institutions (Europe)
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Politics and International Relations
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Politics and International Relations > Conflict Analysis Research Centre
Depositing User: Neophytos Loizides
Date Deposited: 14 Oct 2015 12:56 UTC
Last Modified: 17 Oct 2017 10:54 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/50987 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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