The online platform for Taylor & Francis Group content
Cookies Notification
This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Find out more.
Advanced Search

Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy: An International Journal for Theory, Research and Practice

Translator disclaimer
Reflection, reflective practice and embodied reflective practice

Reflection, reflective practice and embodied reflective practice

DOI:
10.1080/17432979.2013.797498
Jennifer Leighab* & Richard Baileyb

Publishing models and article dates explained
Received: 23 Dec 2012
Accepted: 09 Apr 2013
Published online: 14 May 2013
Article Views: 7

Abstract

Although widely employed in professional practice of all kinds, ‘reflection’ and ‘reflective practice’ can be considered ‘success words’. That is, they elicit positive and supportive responses and yet the concepts are vague, ill-defined, contradictory and reflective skills can be hard to teach. Using examples from education and somatic movement therapy, we argue that a purely analytical approach to reflective practice that involves reflecting on thoughts alone is likely to lead into a negative cycle of rumination. Falling into this cycle of rumination, self-focus has been linked to depression, neuroticism, anxiety and the like. In contrast, an embodied reflective practice focuses on an increased self-awareness grounded in physical sensation, although including images, thoughts and feelings. This embodied self-awareness can increase adaptive empathy, and a focus on embodied experience can lead to a decrease in rumination. Embodied self-awareness can be taught, and this, in turn, can be used to teach the skills of an embodied reflective practice, which could be beneficial for both self-development and professional practice.

Keywords

Related
 

Details

  • Received: 23 Dec 2012
  • Accepted: 09 Apr 2013
  • Published online: 14 May 2013

Author affiliations

  • a Centre for the Study of Higher Education, University of Kent , Kent , UK
  • b Faculty of Health and Education, Liverpool John Moores University , Merseyside , UK

Librarians

Taylor & Francis Group