China's quest for oil security: oil (wars) in the pipeline?

Lee, Pak K. (2005) China's quest for oil security: oil (wars) in the pipeline? Pacific Review, 18 (2). pp. 265-301. ISSN 0951-2748. (Full text available)

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Abstract

China's rapidly expanding demand for crude oil in the 1990s has brought about debates about the potential impact of the energy challenges facing China. Within the country, energy as a security issue has seized the attention of its leaders. Outside China, international strategic thinkers have been arguing among themselves over how China's thirst for oil would impact on regional peace and stability. This paper sets out to examine the following questions: How and why has the basic need for crude oil been perceived as a security question in China? How does China enhance its oil security? Is the option to engage Russia and Central Asia viable and why? What are the possible impacts of China's oil diplomacy on regional security and stability? It concludes that the oil diplomacy with Kazakhstan and Russia is far from promising. In the short run, China has to rely on the oil in the Middle East and to exploit the resource in its offshore areas in the medium to long term. This may lead to festering relations with Russia, the US, Japan, India and the Southeast Asian nations. The growing presence of China in the Persian Gulf and East and South China Sea gives cause for concern to the US, Japan, India and the Southeast Asian states.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: oil security; Nakhodka, Daqing, Japan, Kazakhstan, American Containment of China
Subjects: J Political Science > JZ International relations
J Political Science > JQ Political institutions Asia
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Politics and International Relations
Depositing User: Pak K Lee
Date Deposited: 15 Mar 2009 14:54
Last Modified: 11 Oct 2013 13:45
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/9359 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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