Diagnosing some ills: the archaeology, literature and history of Roman medicine

Baker, P.A. (2002) Diagnosing some ills: the archaeology, literature and history of Roman medicine. In: Baker, P.A. and Carr, G., eds. Practitioners, Practices and Patients New Approaches to Medical Archaeology and Anthropology: Conference Proceedings. Oxbow Books, Oxford, pp. 16-29. ISBN 9781842170793. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Abstract

This paper questions two points: the manner in which archaeologists interpret medical tools from the Greco-Roman era and how scholars of ancient medical literature disregard archaeological evidence in their interpretations of past medical practices. In this author argues that archaeology can contribute much to our knowledge of medical treatment in the past, but warns that until very recently the archaeological studies has remained descriptive, avoiding any theoretical interpretation: this may account for the neglect of archaeological evidence hitherto. The paper has already begun to change professional perceptions in this respect.

Item Type: Book section
Subjects: C Auxiliary Sciences of History > CC Archaeology
D History General and Old World
R Medicine
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of European Culture and Languages
Depositing User: Patricia Baker
Date Deposited: 24 Sep 2008 18:00
Last Modified: 14 Jan 2010 14:32
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/8745 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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