Velocity study of axisymmetric protostellar jets with molecular cooling

Moraghan, Antony J. and Smith, Michael D. and Rosen, Alexander (2006) Velocity study of axisymmetric protostellar jets with molecular cooling. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 371 (3). pp. 1448-1458. ISSN 0035-8711. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2966.2006.10791.x

Abstract

The properties of bipolar outflows depend on the structure in the environment as well as the nature of the jet. To help distinguish between the two, we investigate here the properties pertaining to the ambient medium. We execute axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations, injecting continuous atomic jets into molecular media with density gradients (protostellar cores) and density discontinuities (thick swept-up sheets). We determine the distribution of outflowing mass with radial velocity (the mass spectrum) to quantify our approach and to compare to observationally determined values. We uncover a sequence from clump entrainment in the flanks to bow shock sweeping as the density profile steepens. We also find that the dense, highly supersonic outflows remain collimated but can become turbulent after passing through a shell. The mass spectra vary substantially in time, especially at radial speeds exceeding 15 kms-1. The mass spectra also vary according to the conditions: both envelope-type density distributions and the passage through dense sheets generate considerably steeper mass spectra than a uniform medium. The simulations suggest that observed outflows penetrate highly non-uniform media.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Q Science
Divisions: Faculties > Science Technology and Medical Studies > School of Physical Sciences
Depositing User: Michael Smith
Date Deposited: 06 Sep 2008 21:01
Last Modified: 09 Jun 2014 09:26
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/8329 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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