Dispositional versus epistemic causality

Williamson, J. Dispositional versus epistemic causality. Minds and Machines, 16 . pp. 259-276. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Abstract

I put forward several desiderata that a philosophical theory of causality should satisfy: it should account for the objectivity of causality, it should underpin formalisms for causal reasoning, it should admit a viable epistemology, it should be able to cope with the great variety of causal claims that are made, and it should be ontologically parsimonious. I argue that Nancy Cartwright's dispositional account of causality goes part way towards meeting these criteria but is lacking in important respects. I go on to argue that my epistemic account, which ties causal relationships to an agent's knowledge and ignorance, performs well in the light of the desiderata. Such an account, I claim, is all we require from a theory of causality.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > B Philosophy (General)
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of European Culture and Languages
Depositing User: Jon Williamson
Date Deposited: 29 Jun 2011 13:49
Last Modified: 20 Jan 2012 15:03
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/7361 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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