King George III and porphyria: an elemental hypothesis and investigation.

Cox, Timothy M. and Jack, Nicola and Lofthouse, Simon and Watling, John and Haines, Janice and Warren, Martin J. (2005) King George III and porphyria: an elemental hypothesis and investigation. Lancet, 366 . pp. 332-335. (Access to this publication is restricted)

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Abstract

In 1969 it was proposed that the episodic madness suffered by King George III (1738-1820) resulted from an acute hereditary porphyria, variegate porphyria, caused by deficiency of protoporphyrinogen oxidase. The diagnosis was based on the historical archive and a contentious claim that living members of the House of Hanover were affected with the condition. A re-examination of the medical evidence and the appearance of new historical material have suggested that porphyria did indeed exist in the Royal Houses of Europe. We report the analysis of hair obtained from George III. Although no genomic DNA could be obtained, metal analysis revealed high concentrations of arsenic. Since arsenic interferes with haem metabolism, it might have contributed to the King's unusually severe and prolonged bouts of illness. We have identified sources of arsenic in the context of the medication George III received from physicians.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Q Science
Divisions: Faculties > Science Technology and Medical Studies > School of Biosciences > Protein Science Group
Depositing User: Sue Davies
Date Deposited: 19 Dec 2007 17:53
Last Modified: 15 May 2014 14:02
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/72 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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