Cardiovascular disease risk factors in habitual exercisers, lean sedentary men and abdominally obese sedentary men

O'Donovan, G. and Owen, A. and Kearney, E.M. and Jones, D.W. and Nevill, A.M. and Woolf-May, K. and Bird, S.R. (2005) Cardiovascular disease risk factors in habitual exercisers, lean sedentary men and abdominally obese sedentary men. Int J Obes (Lond), 29 (9). pp. 1063-1069. ISSN 0307-0565 . (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ijo.0803004

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the favourable cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor profile of habitual exercisers is attributable to exercise or leanness. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study of 113 nonsmoking men aged 30-45 y. CVD risk factors were compared in exercisers (n=39) and sedentary men (n=74), and in subgroups of lean exercisers (n=37), lean sedentary men (n=46) and obese sedentary men (n=28). Waist girth was used to identify lean (<100 cm) and abdominally obese (> or =100 cm) subgroups. MEASUREMENTS: Blood pressure, physical activity (7-day recall), physical fitness (maximum oxygen consumption) and fasted lipoproteins, apolipoprotein (apo) B, triglycerides, glucose and fibrinogen. RESULTS: Exercisers were fitter and leaner than sedentary men and had a better CVD risk factor profile. Total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and apo B concentrations were lower in lean exercisers than in lean sedentary men, suggesting that exercise influences these risk factors. Indeed, time spent in vigorous activity was the only significant predictor of total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol in multiple linear regression models. Exercise status had little influence on triglycerides and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), and unfavourable levels were only evident among obese sedentary men. Waist girth was the sole predictor of triglycerides and HDL-C, explaining 44 and 31% of the variance, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the CVD risk factor profile of habitual exercisers is attributable to leanness and exercise. Leanness is associated with favourable levels of HDL-C and triglycerides, while exercise is associated with lower levels of total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and apo B.

Item Type: Article
Additional information: 0307-0565 (Print) Journal Article Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Uncontrolled keywords: Adult Apolipoproteins B/blood Blood Pressure/physiology Body Fat Distribution Body Mass Index Cardiovascular Diseases/*etiology/physiopathology Cholesterol/blood Cholesterol, HDL/blood Cholesterol, LDL/blood Cross-Sectional Studies Energy Metabolism/physiology Exercise/*physiology Humans Male Middle Aged Obesity/complications/*physiopathology Oxygen Consumption/physiology Risk Factors Thinness/*physiopathology Triglycerides/blood
Subjects: Q Science
Divisions: Faculties > Science Technology and Medical Studies > School of Biosciences > Biomedical Research Group
Depositing User: D Wynne Jones
Date Deposited: 04 Sep 2008 17:48
Last Modified: 14 Jan 2010 14:21
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/5597 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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