Localization of fission yeast type II myosin, Myo2, to the cytokinetic actin ring is regulated by phosphorylation of a C-terminal coiled-coil domain and requires a functional septation initiation network.

Mulvihill, Daniel P. and Barretto, Caroline and Hyams, Jeremy S. (2001) Localization of fission yeast type II myosin, Myo2, to the cytokinetic actin ring is regulated by phosphorylation of a C-terminal coiled-coil domain and requires a functional septation initiation network. Molecular Biology of the Cell, 12 (12). pp. 4044-4053. ISSN 1059-1524 . (Access to this publication is restricted)

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Abstract

Myo2 truncations fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) defined a C-terminal domain essential for the localization of Myo2 to the cytokinetic actin ring (CAR). The localization domain contained two predicted phosphorylation sites. Mutation of serine 1518 to alanine (S(1518)A) abolished Myo2 localization, whereas Myo2 with a glutamic acid at this position (S(1518)E) localized to the CAR. GFP-Myo2 formed rings in the septation initiation kinase (SIN) mutant cdc7-24 at 25 degrees C but not at 36 degrees C. GFP-Myo2S(1518)E rings persisted at 36 degrees C in cdc7-24 but not in another SIN kinase mutant, sid2-250. To further examine the relationship between Myo2 and the SIN pathway, the chromosomal copy of myo2(+) was fused to GFP (strain myo2-gc). Myo2 ring formation was abolished in the double mutants myo2-gc cdc7.24 and myo2-gc sid2-250 at the restrictive temperature. In contrast, activation of the SIN pathway in the double mutant myo2-gc cdc16-116 resulted in the formation of Myo2 rings which subsequently collapsed at 36 degrees C. We conclude that the SIN pathway that controls septation in fission yeast also regulates Myo2 ring formation and contraction. Cdc7 and Sid2 are involved in ring formation, in the case of Cdc7 by phosphorylation of a single serine residue in the Myo2 tail. Other kinases and/or phosphatases may control ring contraction.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Q Science
Divisions: Faculties > Science Technology and Medical Studies > School of Biosciences > Cell & Developmental Biology Group
Depositing User: Sue Davies
Date Deposited: 19 Dec 2007 17:50
Last Modified: 02 Jun 2014 14:02
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/53 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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