Valuing Non-market Benefits Derived from Allotments in South-East England: A Contingent Valuation Study

Perez-Vazquez, Arturo and Anderson, Simon and Wiltshire, Richard and Fraser, Robert (2006) Valuing Non-market Benefits Derived from Allotments in South-East England: A Contingent Valuation Study. International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology , 13 (2). pp. 103-112. ISSN 1350-4509. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Abstract

The English derive a wide range of values from allotments, but nearly 35% of allotments have disappeared in the last 20 years. The real value of allotments has probably been underestimated. The contingent valuation method (CVM) was used to give a monetary value to benefits derived from allotments by allotment holders and local residents. The study was conducted in southeast England (Wye and Ashford, Kent and Greater London). A postal survey with open-ended questions was filled in by 124 allotment holders and 74 residents. Respondents were asked to express their maximum willingness to pay for allotments (WTP) and the minimum willingness to accept (WTA) compensation for loss of allotments. The mean annual WTP for keeping allotments of allotment holders were 78.93 pound, 35.64 pound and 79.43 pound, and for local residents were 41.66 pound, 46.14 pound and 283.57 pound, in Wye, Ashford and London, respectively. The allotment holders' WTP was strategically more than WTA compensation and they were only willing to pay rent for using allotments, not for retaining them.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: economic valuation; contingent valuation; total economic value; urban agriculture; allotments; England
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > Kent Business School
Depositing User: Robert Fraser
Date Deposited: 17 Sep 2008 10:59
Last Modified: 11 Apr 2014 11:32
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/5191 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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