Does ISO 9000 Accreditation Make a Profound Difference to the Way Service Quality is Perceived and Measured?

Dick, Gavin P.M. and Brown, Jane C. and Gallimore, Kevin (2002) Does ISO 9000 Accreditation Make a Profound Difference to the Way Service Quality is Perceived and Measured? Managing Service Quality, 12 (1). pp. 30-42. ISSN 0960-4529. (Full text available)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/09604520210415371

Abstract

The article examines the usage and relative importance of quality measurements in the UK’s largest service companies. The authors analyse the relationship of both internal and customer-based quality measurements to the importance placed on accreditation to an ISO 9000 standard. The effect of process structure is explored by categorising the service firms as being in front-room or back-room dominant service sectors. The authors find that the service firms, which consider accreditation to be important, have a different emphasis on quality than other service firms do. Significantly, their emphasis shifts from one that is in line with their process structure to a more balanced one, where both internal and customer-based quality measurements receive similar attention. This leads them to conclude that accreditation to an ISO 9000 standard can make a profound difference to the way quality is perceived and measured in large service firms.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > Kent Business School > Business process/operations
Depositing User: Gavin Dick
Date Deposited: 10 Sep 2008 12:29
Last Modified: 30 Apr 2014 10:04
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/5115 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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