Capture of hypervelocity particles in aerogel: in ground laboratory and low earth orbit

Burchell, M.J. and Thomson, R. and Yano, H. (1999) Capture of hypervelocity particles in aerogel: in ground laboratory and low earth orbit. Planetary and Space Science, 47 (1-2). pp. 189-204. ISSN 0032-0633 . (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0032-0633(98)00085-3

Abstract

We have investigated in the laboratory the capture in aerogel (density 92.5 +/- 0.5 kg m(-3)) of small particles travelling at (5.1 +/- 0.2) km s(-1). The particles used were soda glass spheres and irregularly shaped olivine and iron particles, with mean diameters in the range 75-355 microns. We have measured the impact site for each particle, characterised by the mean diameter of the entrance hole in the aerogel, the minimum and maximum radii of the damaged region in the surface of the aerogel around the entrance hole, the length of the track in the aerogel caused by passage of the particle into the aerogel's interior, and the diameter of the captured particle (if seen) found near the end of the track. For each type of particle we establish relationships between the observed parameters and the pre-impact particle size. We find that the processes resulting in the observed surface features and the capture of the particles in the interior of the aerogel are different. We also find that the particle shape (spherical/irregular) does not unduly influence penetration depths in the aerogel. We have studied the effects of non-normal incidence on the observed impact features and find that the angle of incidence can be reconstructed to within +/-2 degrees. We compare the laboratory obtained data with that measured for four particles captured in a sample of aerogel flown in a Low Earth Orbit on board the EuReCa spacecraft. The density of one of the particles is predicted to be (1776 +/- 346) km m(-3). Using the ability to reconstruct impact direction the probable nature of the particles is shown to be micrometeoroids with retrograde trajectory.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Q Science
Divisions: Faculties > Science Technology and Medical Studies > School of Physical Sciences > Centre for Astrophysics and Planetary Sciences
Faculties > Science Technology and Medical Studies > School of Physical Sciences
Depositing User: Mark Burchell
Date Deposited: 13 Jun 2009 13:50
Last Modified: 21 May 2011 23:52
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/5042 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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