Beyond secondary emotions: The infrahumanization of outgroups using human-related and animal-related words

Viki, G.T. and Winchester, L. and Titshall, L. and Chisango, T. and Pina, A. and Russell, R. (2006) Beyond secondary emotions: The infrahumanization of outgroups using human-related and animal-related words. Social Cognition, 24 (6). pp. 753-775. ISSN 0278-016X. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1521/soco.2006.24.6.753

Abstract

This paper reports four series of studies that examined the infrahumanization effect using a different measure. Across the four studies, we examined whether people would associate their ingroup more with human- (vs. animal-) related words in comparison to outgroups. In Study 1, we used the Implicit Association Test (Greenwald et al., 1998) and found that participants were quicker during the compatible task (when ingroup names and human-related words shared the same response key and outgroup names and animal-related words shared the same response key) in comparison to the incompatible task. Studies 2a and 2b utilized a paper and pencil design and found that participants were more likely to link ingroup names with human-related words in comparison to the outgroup. In Studies 3a and 3b, we found that participants selected human-related words as being more characteristic of the ingroup in general than the outgroup. In Study 4, we used positive and negative words and found that participants were more likely to link human-related words with ingroup (vs. outgroup) names regardless of valence. Results are discussed in relation to their implications for infrahumanization theory.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: C.A. Simms
Date Deposited: 04 Sep 2008 11:14
Last Modified: 24 Sep 2013 15:52
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/4551 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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