Evolutionary Origins of Leadership and Followership

Van Vugt, Mark (2006) Evolutionary Origins of Leadership and Followership. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 10 (4). pp. 354-371. ISSN 1088-8683. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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http://psr.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/10/4/3...

Abstract

Drawing upon evolutionary logic, leadership is reconceptualized in terms of the outcome of strategic interactions among individuals who are following different, yet complementary, decision rules to solve recurrent coordination problems. This article uses the vast psychological literature on leadership as a database to test several evolutionary hypotheses about the origins of leadership and followership in humans. As expected, leadership correlates with initiative taking, trait measures of intelligence, specific task competencies, and several indicators of generosity. The review finds no link between leadership and dominance. The evolutionary analysis accounts for reliable age, health, and sex differences in leadership emergence. In general, evolutionary theory provides a useful, integrative framework for studying leader-follower relationships and generates various novel research hypotheses.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: C.A. Simms
Date Deposited: 04 Sep 2008 13:14
Last Modified: 10 Jun 2014 15:12
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/4522 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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