The Nature of V1 Neural Responses to 2D Moving Patterns Depends on Receptive-Field Structure in the Marmoset Monkey.

Tinsley, Chris J. and Webb, Ben S. and Barraclough, Nick E. and Vincent, Christopher J. and Parker, Amanda and Derrington, Andrew M. (2003) The Nature of V1 Neural Responses to 2D Moving Patterns Depends on Receptive-Field Structure in the Marmoset Monkey. Journal of Neurophysiology, 90 . pp. 930-937. ISSN 0022-3077 . (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

The full text of this publication is not available from this repository. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/jn.00708.2002

Abstract

A plaid pattern is formed when two sinusoidal gratings of different orientations are added together. Previous work has shown that V1 neurons selectively encode the direction and orientation of the component gratings in a moving plaid but not the direction of the plaid itself (Movshon et al. 1985). We recorded the responses of 49 direction-selective neurons to moving gratings and plaid patterns in area V1 of the anesthetized marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus). The responses of V1 neurons to rectangular patches of varying lengths and widths containing gratings of optimal spatial frequency were used to measure size and aspect ratio of the receptive-field subunits. We measured responses to plaid patterns moving in different directions and graded the magnitude of the response to the direction of motion of the plaid and the response to the direction of motion of the component gratings. We found significant correlations between receptive-field structure and the type and strength of its response to moving plaid patterns. The strength of pattern and component responses was significantly correlated with the interrelated properties of direction tuning width (Spearman's r = 0.82, P < 0.001), and receptive-field subunit aspect ratio (Spearman's r = –0.79, P < 0.001). Neurons with broad direction tuning and short, wide receptive-field subunits gave their greatest response when the plaid moved in their preferred direction. Conversely, neurons with narrow direction tuning and long, narrow receptive-field subunits gave their greatest responses when the plaid moved in a direction such that one of its components moved in the preferred direction.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: C.A. Simms
Date Deposited: 01 Sep 2008 05:12
Last Modified: 16 Jun 2014 11:28
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/4503 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
  • Depositors only (login required):