The effect of stimulus height on visual discrimination in horses

Hall, C.A. and Cassaday, H.J. and Derrington, A.M. (2003) The effect of stimulus height on visual discrimination in horses. Journal of Animal Science, 81 (7). pp. 1715-1720. ISSN 0021-8812 . (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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http://jas.fass.org/cgi/reprint/81/7/1715

Abstract

This study investigated the effect of stimulus height on the ability of horses to learn a simple visual discrimination task. Eight horses were trained to perform a two-choice, black/white discrimination with stimuli presented at one of two heights: ground level or at a height of 70 cm from the ground. The height at which the stimuli were presented was alternated from one session to the next. All trials within a single session were presented at the same height. The criterion for learning was four consecutive sessions of 70% correct responses. Performance was found to be better when stimuli were presented at ground level with respect to the number of trials taken to reach the criterion (P < 0.05), percentage of correct first choices (P < 0.01), and repeated errors made (P < 0.01). Thus, training horses to carry out tasks of visual discrimination could be enhanced by placing the stimuli on the ground. In addition, the results of the present study suggest that the visual appearance of ground surfaces is an important factor in both horse management and training

Item Type: Article
Additional information: MENASHA THEN ALBANY THEN CHAMPAIGN ILLINOIS 0021-8812 Monthly: 9-14 issues per year AMERICAN SOCIETY OF ANIMAL SCIENCE United States English
Uncontrolled keywords: discrimination; height; horses; learning; stimuli; vision
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Ros Beeching
Date Deposited: 09 Jun 2008 17:33
Last Modified: 14 Jan 2010 14:15
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/4309 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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