Right about others, wrong about ourselves? Actual and perceived self-other differences in resistance to persuasion

Douglas, Karen and Sutton, Robbie M. (2004) Right about others, wrong about ourselves? Actual and perceived self-other differences in resistance to persuasion. British Journal of Social Psychology, 43 (4). pp. 585-603. ISSN 0144-6665 . (Full text available)

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Abstract

The third-person effect (TPE) is the tendency for people to perceive the media as more influential on others than on themselves. This study introduced a new methodological paradigm for measuring the TPE and examined whether the effect stems from an overestimation of the persuasibility of others, an underestimation of the persuasibility of the self, both, or neither. In three studies, we compared ratings of (a) current self attitudes (both baseline and post-persuasion), (b) current others' attitudes (both baseline and post-persuasion), (c) retrospective self attitudes, and (d) retrospective others' attitudes. We also measured traditional third-person perception ratings of perceived influence. Rather than overestimating others' attitude change, we found evidence that people underestimated the extent to which their own attitudes had, or would have, changed.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Karen Douglas
Date Deposited: 16 Jun 2008 17:00
Last Modified: 16 May 2014 14:14
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/4240 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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