Multiple categorization and implicit intergroup bias: differential category dominance and the positive-negative asymmetry effect.

Crisp, Richard J. and Hewstone, Miles (2001) Multiple categorization and implicit intergroup bias: differential category dominance and the positive-negative asymmetry effect. European Journal of Social Psychology, 31 (1). pp. 45-62. ISSN 0046-2772 . (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Abstract

Two experiments explored the differential information processing that occurs when perceivers encounter multiple categorizable individuals. participants were required to recall specific information from previously encountered bogus newspaper stories. Across two experiments it emerged that participants differentially recalled target attributes as a function of positive versus negative story context and multiple dimensions of group membership. Specifically different dimensions of categorization were dominant for positive and negative evaluative domains. These findings provide an important qualification to the positive-negative asymmetry effect in intergroup discrimination when multiple dimensions of categorization are available. In addition, comparison of the observed effects in different cultural settings suggests the need to consider contextual influences when considering intergroup phenomena with real social group memberships. Finally, in line with previous work, a dissociation was observed between explicit and implicit measures of intergroup bias. The findings are considered within the wider context of work into social categorization and intergroup relations

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Ros Beeching
Date Deposited: 16 Jun 2008 17:16
Last Modified: 15 May 2014 13:48
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/4200 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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