Despicability in the workplace: Effects of behavioral deviance and unlikeability on the evaluation of in-group and out-group members

Bown, Nicola and Abrams, Dominic (2003) Despicability in the workplace: Effects of behavioral deviance and unlikeability on the evaluation of in-group and out-group members. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 33 (11). pp. 2413-2426. ISSN 0021-9029 . (Access to this publication is restricted)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-1816.2003.tb01892...

Abstract

Abstract: This study examined how members of functionally independent work groups (bank employees) evaluated behavioral deviance among in-group and out-group members. Members' behavior was either modal (normative) or deviant in relation to workplace norms, and members were either likeable or unlikeable. Based on social identity theory (Tajfel & Turner, 1979) and on the black-sheep effect (e.g., Marques & Paez, 1994), it was predicted that both unlikeability and deviance would result in more negative evaluations. It was also predicted that behavior that challenged prescriptive in-group standards would result in relative derogation of in-group targets compared to similar out-group targets (the evaluative extremity effect). These hypotheses were supported. Discussion focuses on how evaluations of deviant group members help to preserve a positive sense of social identity. Practical implications of social deviance in the workplace are considered.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Ros Beeching
Date Deposited: 29 Aug 2008 14:03
Last Modified: 11 Apr 2014 08:28
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/4146 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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