The talk goes outside: argument, privacy and power in Mambila society. Towards a sociology of embedded praxis

Zeitlyn, David (2003) The talk goes outside: argument, privacy and power in Mambila society. Towards a sociology of embedded praxis. Africa, 73 (4). pp. 606-622. ISSN 0001-9720 . (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Abstract

In this paper the sociological implications of loud argument are considered, by taking a case study from the Mambila in Cameroon. Meetings of rotating credit societies are non-traditional forums where power and status are in dispute. These meetings contrast with both domestic arguments and with disputes held in the Chief's court. Rotating credit society meetings usually include arguments but these are dismissed as being unimportant by local informants. They pose a challenge for anthropological analysis since they are such a regular but disregarded-and disparaged-occurrence. Raised voices increase the range of bystanders as witnesses, so to argue loudly is a very social act.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GN Anthropology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > Social and Cultural Anthropology
Depositing User: D. Zeitlyn
Date Deposited: 22 Sep 2008 21:43
Last Modified: 14 Jan 2010 14:12
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/3679 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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