Measuring social desirability amongst men with intellectual disabilities: the psychometric properties of the self and other deception questionnaire - Intellectual disabilities

Langdon, Peter E. and Clare, Isabel C. H. and Murphy, Glynis H. (2010) Measuring social desirability amongst men with intellectual disabilities: the psychometric properties of the self and other deception questionnaire - Intellectual disabilities. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 31 (6). pp. 1601-1608. ISSN 0891-4222. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ridd.2010.05.001

Abstract

Background Social desirability has been construed as either inaccurately attributing positive characteristics to oneself (self-deception), or inaccurately denying that one possesses undesirable characteristics to others (other-deception or impression management). These conceptualisations of social desirability have not been considered in relation to people with intellectual disabilities (IDs), but they are important constructs to consider when undertaking a psychological assessment of an individual, especially within forensic contexts. Therefore, we revised two existing measures of self- and other-deception and considered their psychometric properties. Methods Thirty-two men with mild IDs and 28 men without IDs completed the Self- and Other-Deception Questionnaires—Intellectual Disabilities (SDQ-ID and ODQ-ID) on two occasions, two weeks apart. Results Men with IDs scored significantly higher on the SDQ-ID and the ODQ-ID than men without IDs. However, these differences disappeared when Full Scale IQ, Verbal IQ and Performance IQ were controlled in relation to the SDQ-ID, and partially disappeared in relation to the ODQ-ID. The SDQ-ID and the ODQ-ID had substantial internal consistency in relation to men with IDs (k = 0.82 and 0.84 respectively). The test-retest reliability of the SDQ-ID was good (ri = 0.68), while the test-retest reliability of the ODQ-ID was moderate (ri = 0.56), for men with IDs. The SDQ-ID had moderate (k = 0.60) and the ODQ-ID had substantial (k = 0.70) internal consistency in relation to men without IDs, while the test-retest reliability of the SDQ-ID was excellent (ri = 0.87) as was the case for the ODQ-ID (ri = 0.85). Conclusions The SDQ-ID and the ODQ-ID have satisfactory psychometric properties in relation to men with and without IDs. Future research using these instruments is proposed

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: Social desirability; Deception; Self-Deception Questionnaire; Other-Deception Questionnaire; ODQ-ID; SDQ-ID; Learning disabilities; Forensic assessment
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare > HV1568 Disability studies
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Tizard
Depositing User: Peter Langdon
Date Deposited: 03 Dec 2012 12:13
Last Modified: 07 May 2014 14:38
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/32258 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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