Enhanced drug targeting by attachment of an anti αv integrin antibody to doxorubicin loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles

Wagner, Sylvia and Rothweiler, Florian and Anhorn, Marion G. and Sauer, Daniel and Riemann, Iris and Weiss, Eike C. and Katsen-Globa, Alisa and Michaelis, Martin and Cinatl Jr., Jindrich and Schwartz, Daniel (2010) Enhanced drug targeting by attachment of an anti αv integrin antibody to doxorubicin loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles. Biomaterials, 31 (8). pp. 2388-2398. ISSN 01429612. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biomaterials.2009.11.0...

Abstract

Specific transport of anti-cancer drugs into tumor cells may result in increased therapeutic efficacy and decreased adverse events. Expression of αvβ3 integrin is enhanced in various types of cancer and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against αvβ3 integrins hold promise for anti-cancer therapy. DI17E6 is a monoclonal antibody directed against αv integrins that inhibits growth of melanomas in vitro and in vivo and inhibits angiogenesis due to interference with αvβ3 integrins. Here, DI17E6 was covalently coupled to human serum albumin nanoparticles. Resulting nanoparticles specifically targeted αvβ3 integrin positive melanoma cells. Moreover, doxorubicin loaded DI17E6 nanoparticles showed increased cytotoxic activity in αvβ3-positive melanoma cells than the free drug. Therefore, DI17E6-coupled human serum albumin nanoparticles represent a potential delivery system for targeted drug transport into αvβ3-positive cells.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: Albumin; Chemotherapy; Drug delivery; ECM (extracellular matrix); Integrin; Nanoparticles
Subjects: Q Science
Divisions: Faculties > Science Technology and Medical Studies > School of Biosciences
Depositing User: Sue Davies
Date Deposited: 24 Oct 2012 15:19
Last Modified: 19 Mar 2013 13:49
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/31967 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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