Passive Control of Quorum Sensing: Prevention ofPseudomonas aeruginosaBiofilm Formation by Imprinted Polymers

Piletska, Elena V. and Stavroulakis, Georgios and Larcombe, Lee D. and Whitcombe, Michael J. and Sharma, Anant and Primrose, Sandy and Robinson, Gary K. and Piletsky, Sergey A. (2011) Passive Control of Quorum Sensing: Prevention ofPseudomonas aeruginosaBiofilm Formation by Imprinted Polymers. Biomacromolecules, 12 (4). pp. 1067-1071. ISSN 1525-7797. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/bm101410q

Abstract

Here we present the first molecular imprinted polymer (MIP) that is able to attenuate the biofilm formation of the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa through specific sequestration of its signal molecule N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-AHL). The MIP was rationally designed using computational modeling, and its capacity and specificity and that of a corresponding blank polymer toward signal molecule of P. aeruginosa (3-oxo-C12-AHL) and its analogue were tested. The biofilm formation in the presence of polymers and without polymers was studied using scanning confocal laser microscopy. Staining with crystal violet dye was used for the quantification of the biofilm formation. A significant reduction of the biofilm growth was observed in the presence of MIP (>80%), which was superior to that of the resin prepared without template, which showed a reduction of 40% in comparison with biofilm, which was grown without polymer addition. It was shown that 3-oxo-C12-AHL-specific MIP prevented the development of quorum-sensing-controlled phenotypes (in this case, biofilm formation) from being up-regulated. The developed MIP could be considered as a new tool for the elimination of life-threatening infections in a multitude of practical applications; it could, for example, be grafted on the surface of medical devices such as catheters and lenses, be a component of paints, or be used as a wound adsorbent.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Q Science
Divisions: Faculties > Science Technology and Medical Studies > School of Biosciences
Depositing User: Sue Davies
Date Deposited: 09 Oct 2012 08:38
Last Modified: 31 Jan 2013 09:25
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/31410 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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