Do Anthropogenic Dark Earths occur in the interior of Borneo? Some initial observations from East Kalimantan

Sheil, Douglas and Basuki, Imam and German, Laura and Kuyper, Thomas W. and Limberg, Godwin and Puri, Rajindra K. and Sellato, Bernard and van Noordwijk, Meine and Wollenberg, Eva (2012) Do Anthropogenic Dark Earths occur in the interior of Borneo? Some initial observations from East Kalimantan. Forests, 3 (2). pp. 207-229. ISSN 1999-4907. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/f3020207

Abstract

Anthropogenic soils of the Amazon Basin (Terra Preta, Terra Mulata) reveal that pre-Colombian peoples made lasting improvements in the agricultural potential of nutrient-poor soils. Some have argued that applying similar techniques could improve agriculture over much of the humid tropics, enhancing local livelihoods and food security, while also sequestering large quantities of carbon to mitigate climate change. Here, we present preliminary evidence for Anthropogenic Dark Earths (ADEs) in tropical Asia. Our surveys in East Kalimantan (Indonesian Borneo) identified several sites where soils possess an anthropogenic development and context similar in several respects to the Amazon’s ADEs. Similarities include riverside locations, presence of useful fruit trees, spatial extent as well as soil characteristics such as dark color, high carbon content (in some cases), high phosphorus levels, and improved apparent fertility in comparison to neighboring soils. Local people value these soils for cultivation but are unaware of their origins. We discuss these soils in the context of local history and land-use and identify numerous unknowns. Incomplete biomass burning appears key to these modified soils. More study is required to clarify soil transformations in Borneo and to determine under what circumstances such soil improvements might remain ongoing.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: char; soil fertility; Hortic Anthrosols; slash and burn; swidden; Terra Preta
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > Environmental Anthropology and Ethnobiology
Depositing User: Rajindra K Puri
Date Deposited: 08 Oct 2012 09:49
Last Modified: 04 Jun 2014 09:01
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/31340 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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