Global human mandibular variation reflects differences in agricultural and hunter-gatherer subsistence strategies

von Cramon-Taubadel, Noreen (2011) Global human mandibular variation reflects differences in agricultural and hunter-gatherer subsistence strategies. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 108 (49). pp. 19546-19551. ISSN 1091-6490. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1113050108

Abstract

Variation in the masticatory behavior of hunter-gatherer and agricultural populations is hypothesized to be one of the major forces affecting the form of the human mandible. However, this has yet to be analyzed at a global level. Here, the relationship between global mandibular shape variation and subsistence economy is tested, while controlling for the potentially confounding effects of shared population history, geography, and climate. The results demonstrate that the mandible, in contrast to the cranium, significantly reflects subsistence strategy rather than neutral genetic patterns, with hunter-gatherers having consistently longer and narrower mandibles than agriculturalists. These results support notions that a decrease in masticatory stress among agriculturalists causes the mandible to grow and develop differently. This developmental argument also explains why there is often a mismatch between the size of the lower face and the dentition, which, in turn, leads to increased prevalence of dental crowding and malocclusions in modern postindustrial populations. Therefore, these results have important implications for our understanding of human masticatory adaptation.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: diet; phenotypic plasticity; mastication; skull
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GN Anthropology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > Biological Anthropology
Depositing User: Shelley Malekia
Date Deposited: 05 Oct 2012 11:31
Last Modified: 28 Jan 2013 11:14
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/31286 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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