War and society in the north of England, c. 1477-1559: the cases of York, Hull and Beverley

Grummitt, David (2008) War and society in the north of England, c. 1477-1559: the cases of York, Hull and Beverley. Northern History, 45 (1). pp. 125-140. ISSN ISSN 0078-172X. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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http://dx.doi.org.chain.kent.ac.uk/10.1179/1745870...

Abstract

The demands and effects of warfare have not been one of the traditional concerns of historians of early modern English towns. This essay looks at the way in which the townsmen of York, Hull and Beverley responded to the demands of war. It explores the level of urban involvement in the king's wars, mainly but not exclusively against the Scots, and the way in which the pressure of war acted to transform relations within towns and relations between towns and their neighbours. In a period when towns were experiencing rapid economic, social and religious change, war provided one means of renegotiating power relations and allowed urban elites to expand their authority, through partnership with the Crown, vis-a-vis their fellow citizens and non-urban elites. The balance between profiting from war and being ruined by its demands was a fine one, however, exemplified by the experience of Hull in the 1540s.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: D History General and Old World > D History (General)
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of History
Depositing User: Zoe Denness
Date Deposited: 24 Sep 2012 15:08
Last Modified: 15 Oct 2012 14:31
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/30909 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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