Genetics and insurance in the United Kingdom 1995-2010: the rise and fall of scientific discrimination

Thomas, R.G. (2012) Genetics and insurance in the United Kingdom 1995-2010: the rise and fall of scientific discrimination. New Genetics and Society, 31 (2). pp. 203-222. ISSN 1463-6778. (Full text available)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14636778.2012.662046

Abstract

Around the millennium there was extensive debate in the United Kingdom of the possible use of predictive genetic tests by insurance companies. Many insurance experts, geneticists and public policymakers appeared to believe that genetic test results would soon become widely used by the insurance industry. This expectation has not been borne out. This article outlines the history of exaggerated perceptions of the significance of genetic test results to insurance, with particular reference to the United Kingdom, suggesting reasons why they arose and also why they have declined. The article concludes with some speculation about how policy on genetics and insurance might develop in future.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: genetics, insurance, discrimination, adverse selection, loss coverage, moral panic
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BJ Ethics
H Social Sciences > HG Finance
H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
Divisions: Faculties > Science Technology and Medical Studies > School of Mathematics Statistics and Actuarial Science > Actuarial Science
Depositing User: R.G. Thomas
Date Deposited: 07 Jul 2012 13:17
Last Modified: 30 Jan 2013 23:05
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/29804 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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