Supported further education provision for people with long-term mental health needs. Findings from a survey of further education colleges and primary care trusts across the south east of England

Morrison, I. and Clift, C.M. and Stosz, L.M. (2010) Supported further education provision for people with long-term mental health needs. Findings from a survey of further education colleges and primary care trusts across the south east of England. Perspectives in Public Health, 130 (2). pp. 78-85. ISSN 1757-9139 . (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1757913909360454

Abstract

Aim: Government policy has highlighted the need for inclusive education for people with long-term mental health needs. As a starting point, the aim of this study was to assess the extent to which further education (FE) colleges in the south east of England provide supported education for people with mental health needs, and the extent to which these organizations collaborate with local NHS primary care trusts (PCTs). Also, to assess the potential numbers of people who might benefit from fully inclusive educational provision needs assessment, together with the potential healthcare cost savings. Method: A survey was conducted of 33 multi-faculty FE colleges and 49 PCTs via structured telephone interviews with nominated representatives, in order to collect quantitative and qualitative data of the provision of supported education provision for people with mental health needs. The FE survey enquired whether they had provision for people with mental health needs, and if so, the details. The PCT survey gathered data on their caseload of standard and enhanced clients for the population covered, and the extent to which they were aware of the benefits of learning on mental health. Results: Only 15 FE colleges (45%) had some form of provision for students with long-term mental health needs, and only six PCTs (12%) provided an educational link co-ordinator. FE colleges with existing provision averaged 70 students per college, against an attainable potential target of 130 students per college. Encouragingly, cohorts of students with mental health needs were reported to have levels of ‘retention’, ‘achievement’ and ‘success’ rates that were comparable with students from the general population on mainstream courses — e.g. expected rates of around 85% retention, 75% achievement (of those retained), 65% success (overall from enrolled to achieving), with some 5% progressing to university and 12% into employment. On present levels of FE recruitment, there is a potential net saving to the taxpayer of £13 million in mental healthcare costs (around 50%) and if recruitment increased to projected levels, then the potential net saving to the taxpayer would be £26 million. The substantial estimated savings to the health budget not only shows that supported education provision in FE is effective in promoting mental health, it also indicates the high level of its cost-effectiveness. Conclusion: This research has implications for budget holders, health promotion staff and mental health teams working within a social model of health, and the collaborative use of resources to assist people recovering from or managing mental health difficulties in moving forward in their lives.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare > HV3008 Mental handicap and social care
L Education > L Education (General)
L Education > LC Special aspects of education > LC5201 Education extension. Adult education. Continuing education
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Tony Rees
Date Deposited: 26 Jun 2012 15:10
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2013 11:30
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/29707 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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