Why Men (and Women) Do and Don't Rebel: Effects of System Justification on Willingness to Protest

Jost, John T. and Chaikalis-Petritsis, Vajelis and Abrams, Dominic and Sidanius, Jim and van der Toorn, Jokanneke and Bratt, Christopher (2012) Why Men (and Women) Do and Don't Rebel: Effects of System Justification on Willingness to Protest. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 38 (2). pp. 197-208. ISSN 0146-1672. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146167211422544

Abstract

Three studies examined the hypothesis that system justification is negatively associated with collective protest against ingroup disadvantage. Effects of uncertainty salience, ingroup identification, and disruptive versus nondisruptive protest were also investigated. In Study 1, college students who were exposed to an uncertainty salience manipulation and who scored higher on system justification were less likely to protest against the governmental bailout of Wall Street. In Study 2, May Day protesters in Greece who were primed with a system-justifying stereotype exhibited less group-based anger and willingness to protest. In Study 3, members of a British teachers union who were primed with a “system-rejecting” mind-set exhibited decreased system justification and increased willingness to protest. The effect of system justification on nondisruptive protest was mediated by group-based anger. Across very different contexts, measures, and methods, the results reveal that, even among political activists, system justification plays a significant role in undermining willingness to protest.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Social Psychology
Depositing User: Esme Rigden
Date Deposited: 18 May 2012 14:59
Last Modified: 11 Apr 2014 07:48
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/29554 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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