Girl, Interrupted: Citizenship and the Irish Hijab Debate

Enright, Máiréad (2011) Girl, Interrupted: Citizenship and the Irish Hijab Debate. Social and Legal Studies, 20 (4). pp. 463-480. ISSN 0964-6639. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0964663911417278

Abstract

This article discusses the case of Shekinah Egan, an Irish Muslim girl who asked to be allowed to wear the hijab to school. It traces the media and government response to her demand, and frames that demand as a citizenship claim. It focuses in particular on a peculiarity of the Irish response; that the government was disinclined to legislate for the headscarf in the classroom. It argues that – perhaps counter-intuitively – the refusal to make law around the hijab operated to silence the citizenship claims at the heart of the Egan case. To this extent, it was a very particular instance of a broader and ongoing pattern of exclusion of the children of migrants from the Irish public sphere.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: K Law
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > Kent Law School
Depositing User: Sarah Slowe
Date Deposited: 16 May 2012 08:54
Last Modified: 18 May 2012 15:26
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/29471 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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