Life transitions: becoming a parent

Johns, S.E. and Belsky, J. (2007) Life transitions: becoming a parent. In: Salmon, C.A. and Shackleford, T.K., eds. Family relationships: an evolutionary perspective. Oxford University Press, Oxford, pp. 71-90. ISBN 9780195320510 . (Access to this publication is restricted)

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Abstract

The birth of a child is a commonplace event, yet for the two individuals who become parents this transition to parenthood is a major life event. For men and women the challenges of parenthood will differ, and their relationship will undergo change as the demands of their new roles become apparent. Parenthood has the potential to change both men's and women's feelings about themselves and their relationship. This chapter explores the transition to parenthood, in particular asking why this can be difficult, why the experience of having a child is different for men and women, how the timing of the transition can be influenced by family relationships, and how the ease of transition for one generation can influence the timing of the transition in subsequent generations. This includes both proximate psychological aspects of becoming a parent and evolutionary or ultimate explanations of human reproductive patterns and parenting behaviors.

Item Type: Book section
Uncontrolled keywords: Parenthood, roles, proximate, ultimate, parenting behaviors, transitions
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GN Anthropology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > Biological Anthropology
Depositing User: Sarah Johns
Date Deposited: 25 Apr 2008 15:21
Last Modified: 24 Jul 2012 07:39
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/2915 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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