The David and Goliath principle: Cultural, ideological and attitudinal underpinnings of the normative protection of low status groups from criticism.

Jeffries, Carla H. and Hornsey, Matthew J. and Sutton, Robbie M. and Douglas, Karen and Bain, Paul G. (2012) The David and Goliath principle: Cultural, ideological and attitudinal underpinnings of the normative protection of low status groups from criticism. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 38 (8). pp. 1053-1065. ISSN 0146-1672. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Abstract

Two studies documented the “David and Goliath” rule – the tendency for people to perceive criticism of “David” groups (groups with low power and status) as less normatively permissible than criticism of “Goliath” groups (groups with high power and status). We confirmed the existence of the David and Goliath rule across five national samples (Study 1). However the rule was endorsed more strongly in Western than in Chinese cultures, an effect mediated by cultural differences in power distance. Study 2 identified the psychological underpinnings of this rule in an Australian sample. Lower social dominance orientation (SDO) was associated with greater endorsement of the rule, an effect mediated through the differential attribution of stereotypes. Specifically, those low in SDO were more likely to attribute traits of warmth and incompetence to David versus Goliath groups, a pattern of stereotypes that was related to the protection of David groups from criticism.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
H Social Sciences > HT Communities. Classes. Races
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Social Psychology
Depositing User: Karen Douglas
Date Deposited: 13 Feb 2012 10:58
Last Modified: 16 May 2014 14:11
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/28701 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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