Alienation as a critical concept

Sayers, Sean (2011) Alienation as a critical concept. International Critical Thought, 1 (3). pp. 287-304. ISSN 2159-8282. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21598282.2011.609265

Abstract

This paper discusses Marx's concept of alienated (or estranged) labour, focusing mainly on his account in the Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844. This concept is frequently taken to be a moral notion based on a concept of universal human nature. This view is criticized and it is argued that the concept of alienation should rather be interpreted in the light of Hegelian historical ideas. In Hegel, alienation is not a purely negative phenomenon; it is a necessary stage of human development. Marx's account of alienated labour should be understood in similar terms. It is not a merely subjective discontent with work; it is an objective and historically specific condition, a stage in the process of historical development. Marx usually regards it as specific to capitalism. The criticism of capitalism implied in the concept of alienation, it is argued, does not appeal to universal moral standards; it is historical and relative. Overcoming alienation must also be understood in historical terms, not as the realization of a universal ideal, but as the dialectical supersession of capitalist conditions of labour. Marx's account of communism as the overcoming of alienation is explained in these terms.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: Marx; Hegel; alienation; labour; morality; social criticism
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > B Philosophy (General)
J Political Science > JC Political theory
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of European Culture and Languages
Depositing User: Sean Sayers
Date Deposited: 30 Nov 2011 16:17
Last Modified: 02 Dec 2011 10:48
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/28515 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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